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Austin Chicken Fried Steak

(15 Votes)
SERVES
4
COOK TIME
10 Min

What could be more Texan than a chicken-fried steak recipe that comes from the capital of Texas?

What You'll Need

  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper, divided
  • 2 1/4 cups milk, divided
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup dry bread crumbs
  • 1 to 1 ¼ pounds beef cubed steak
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 (4 ounce) can sliced black olives, drained

What to Do

  1. In a shallow dish, combine 1/4 cup flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper. In another shallow dish, combine 1/4 cup milk and egg; mix well. Place bread crumbs in a third shallow dish.
     
  2. Coat steak on all sides with flour mixture then egg mixture then bread crumb mixture. Discard any remaining coating mixture.
     
  3. In a large, deep skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add steak and cook 6 to 8 minutes or until juices run clear and coating is golden, turning halfway through cooking. Drain on paper towels. Remove and discard all but 2 tablespoons of oil remaining in skillet.
     
  4. Whisk remaining 2 tablespoons flour into oil and brown over low heat. Add remaining 1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, and 2 cups milk. Whisk 3 to 4 minutes, or until thick; add olives and stir well to mix.
     
  5. Place steak on a serving platter and top with gravy. Serve immediately.
     

Notes

Be sure to add the olives just before you're ready to serve this, or they'll cook too long and make the gravy too salty.

Nutritional InformationShow More

Servings Per Recipe: 4

  • Amount Per Serving % Daily Value *
  • Calories 896
  • Calories from Fat 665
  • Total Fat 74g 114 %
  • Saturated Fat 13g 65 %
  • Trans Fat 0.3g 0 %
  • Protein 34g 68 %
  • Amount Per Serving % Daily Value *
  • Cholesterol 136mg 45 %
  • Sodium 1,358mg 57 %
  • Total Carbohydrates 22g 7 %
  • Dietary Fiber 0.9g 4 %
  • Sugars 7.9g 0 %

Ratings & Comments

My Rating:  

I have not made this yet so I cannot rate it.

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Forget the black olives...strange! And I don't know about the bread crumbs....try Panko or regular bread crumbs...not original to the Texas recipe but I'm willing to try. But definitely NO black olives.

Native Texan here, and I have to agree about the olives. Never seen them on a CFS in my life. Also, most CFS is made with flour, not bread crumbs.

I went to UT in Austin! Austin, Texas Chicken Fried Steak is the best! In fact Austin is noted for it's Chicken Fried Steak! and I'm from New Orleans...a city known for great food.

SandyChilders' earlier comment is spot on for a good starter recipe for TCFS. And if you ever wondered how they get the CFS sooooo big in Texas . . . well, each time you dip the steak in the egg wash and then the flour, knead the steak with your knuckles with a rocking motion in a big bowl or rectangular plastic "tub", similar to the ones they use in restaurants (by using a large tub this will keep your steak and flour IN the tub and NOT everywhere else in your kitchen). This is how you "spread out" the cube steak, and believe you me, it will spread out a good bit. Be careful not to "break" it, unless that is what you want to do. That is how they got the idea for "steak fingers" years ago. They were flouring and kneading the CFS and they spread it out too far and it broke off into smaller pieces. And rather than waste it they simply fried it up and decided they liked "finger sized" CFS too! You should be able to easily double the size of the steak by kneading it the way I mentioned above. Many a restaurant in Texas, from Dairy Queen to your local steak house, has been doing it this way for decades. I should know for I was once a manager of a Dairy Queen and then later a steak house in Texas in my younger days. And, as everyone has pointed out, NO ONE in Texas would ever put olives in their gravy . . . not unless they moved to Texas from Italy! And another way to make great white gravy is to start with a roux - equal parts of butter and flour - and then add your milk and seasonings until desired thickness. All we ever usually put in it besides butter, flour and milk was salt and pepper, but you are free to spice it up however fits your likin'. And always, and I mean ALWAYS, serve your mouth waterin' TCFS with at least one, but preferably two pieces of buttered and grilled Texas Toast with some white gravy on the side to dip it in and a heapin' servin' of good ol' french fries to boot! To this day I prefer my fries dipped in white gravy instead of ketchup. Some Texans fry their CFS in a skillet and some use a deep fryer. Whatever floats your boat! Now THAT is how you should make and eat CFS whether you are from Texas or you wish you were! ;)

Thanks for your tips! I was wondering what kind of gravy the recipe was calling for because I thought it had to be white gravy and I wanted to make my own. The canned white sausage type of gravy is nasty tasting! I do have problems when making a gravy from a roux. I can make the roux, but I don't know how much equal parts to end of with the amount of gravy I need. It's NEVER enough gravy, so I add more milk or broth and then it's too thin and I don't have any more roux. Then what? I usually use 2 tbls of butter and 2 tbls of flour. How much gravy would, say, 1/2 cup equal parts make?

Dunno, maybe the olives are just to " Keep Austin Weird " ???

Better yet look for "Texas Chicken Fried Steak". I grew up in West Texas and lived in Austin. This is more like I remember. I also agree that bread crumbs and olives should not be used. Save them for your potato chip topped casseroles.

I have lived in TX. for 30 years and eaten Chick Fried Steak (CFS) at many restaurants here, including Austin. I have never seen olives in the dish. No one would put it in.

Not meaning to repeat the obvious, but how would a self respecting Texan prepare CFS? Many of us would like to know. Your answer would be appreciated.

Start with tenderized cube steak. I usually cut mine in half so it's easier to work with. In a bowl, beat an egg, and add milk. (I never measure, just add enough to coat meat twice). In another bowl ( I use pie plates) add flour, a little cornmeal, seasoned meat tenderizer, garlic and onion powder and a small dash of cayenne pepper. Mix together well. Pour oil into an electric skillet, add enough oil so it's about 1/4 inch. Heat on med to med.high heat. I dip the meat in the egg, then the flour and repeat. Place in fryer. I keep turning every 3-4 minutes. After it is browned, I'll put the lid on for a few minutes. When done, place on a paper bag. I then make my gravy.

There is no self respecting Texan alive who would call that a CFS.

If this is not how to make chicken fried steak, please tell how you do it. This recipe seems fairly straight forward, except for olives.

Texas Chicken Fried Steak Fixed the way my grandparents make it was like this: take round steak that is low in fat beat it until thin; place steak in a bowl of buttermilk kept in the ice box(this was before refrigerators) over night; remove steak and pat dry; have flour mixed with salt and black pepper into it in a large bowl place steak into flour and press with hands; then dip steak in egg wash(1 or 2 eggs beat with a little water or milk) do both sides; return steak to flour bowl and again press on both sides into the flour mixture; fried steak in a little lard until brown on both sides; serve with milk grave(in same pan you fried the steak in place a little flour and brown flour lightly add milk stir until thicken). This is how you make Chicken Fried Steak the old way. Ruby

Sorry I meant to type gravy not grave. Ruby

Black Olives? Bread Crumbs. Lamesa Tx is the Home to Chicken Fried Steak and I promise you the CFS is much better in the Plains of West Texas than this recipe from Austin.

A real Texan would NOT take a bite of this!

Well, I'm a Texan and I'd "take a bite" of it and not only that, I'd eat the entire thing because *most* Texans are polite and respectful of their hosts, just as they would be respectful AS hosts.

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